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Practice pad... practicing! - Drum Solo Artist

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blabla7
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« on: August 16, 2007, 03:44:41 PM »

First of all, grettings to everyone!
The most of my drum playing is based on the work on the practice pad. I don't have a drum kit yet so I practice on the pad as much as I can.
So far I have been playing single & double strokes, paradiddles, and all the usual begginers stuff.
I have also been trying to improve my wrist and finger control with both the matched and traditional grip.
There is always a lot of room for that stuff to be improved, don't get me wrong, but I feel like I got to learn some new stuff. And I don't know what to practice on a pad exept the basic rudiments. Any help?
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PASHA
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« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2007, 01:23:33 AM »

Actually you can do anything on a practice pad... - The only limit is YOUR OWN IMAGINATION!!!

Did you know that when drummers start... I mean in music schools, in the first semester the only drum set  pupils see is the practice pad Wink - At least it was this way in my school!
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blabla7
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« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2007, 05:42:23 PM »

Actually you can do anything on a practice pad... - The only limit is YOUR OWN IMAGINATION!!!

Did you know that when drummers start... I mean in music schools, in the first semester the only drum set  pupils see is the practice pad Wink - At least it was this way in my school!

Yeah I know, it seems like I'm kinda running out of imagination so I was hoping other source.
I know about the schools and pads, it's probably like that everywhere, it's obvious that pad will be your best friend when it comes to drumming. : )

Btw. I was wondering about something, and for the sake of not smothering this part with question topics I'm gonna ask it here;
I was planing on playing some other drums like Bongo, Tabla or whatever is good. Are there any instruction sources or any good dvd's for teaching to buy?
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PASHA
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« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2007, 01:38:06 AM »

Let me check it out... I will get back to you Monday evening, stay tuned.
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Little-Drummer-Boy
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« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2007, 10:21:24 PM »

If I were you I wouldn't try to learn traditional grip on my own. There are alot of ways that you can screw up your fingers, rists, and you can play the drums better if you use correct technique. Don't ask me though, I'm getting help, myself. Wink
My two bits worth.

Rob
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Remember. If you limit yourself to only doubling with your leading hand... Then... You'll be limiting yourself to only doubling with your leading hand...
blabla7
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« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2007, 09:58:12 AM »

If I were you I wouldn't try to learn traditional grip on my own. There are alot of ways that you can screw up your fingers, rists, and you can play the drums better if you use correct technique. Don't ask me though, I'm getting help, myself. Wink
My two bits worth.

Rob

Well... I'm not quite learning it by myself. I own a couple of great dvd's that teach it and I don't believe that there is a lot of room to mess it up. I suposse you recommend a teacher?
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Little-Drummer-Boy
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« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2007, 03:44:07 PM »

Well... I'm not quite learning it by myself. I own a couple of great dvd's that teach it and I don't believe that there is a lot of room to mess it up. I suposse you recommend a teacher?

Erm... Sorry no...
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Remember. If you limit yourself to only doubling with your leading hand... Then... You'll be limiting yourself to only doubling with your leading hand...
blabla7
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« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2007, 08:38:40 AM »

Erm... Sorry no...

If it's not someone teaching you how can you learn it besides on your own?
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VanzDrumming
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« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2007, 12:39:31 AM »

Hey... when I started playing back 30 years ago I spent about my 1st year on a drum pad.  It was very frustrating but I think it was the best thing for me now.  I have now learned how to apply some really cool stuff to the drum kit.  Building the stck control and hand technique early on is going to make you a much better player in the long run.

Check out this link... http://www.vicfirth.com/education/rudiments.html

It has all the great rudiments.  Do you own any books like Syncopation, Stick Control or Drum Method Book 1?  If not buy them. 

RVP
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PASHA
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« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2007, 06:47:17 AM »

Great reference Van! Wink

And... I know that we DONT allow self/product promotions on this drummers discussion forum, but I hope it is okay with the readers, to mention a few cool things here and there... Anyway, you may also want to check out the new DVD that has recently came out, it has tons of cool exercises and beats, and ideas, it is called Extreme Drum Set Techniques, it is over 2 hours long and it is by Randy Van Patten!

Here is the link to his site:
http://www.vanzdrumming.com/

And here is a news article about it on DSA:
http://www.drumsoloartist.com/cgi-bin/news/2005/news.pl?record=49

Hope that helps Wink
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KenSanders
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« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2007, 05:56:20 PM »

I, too, spent many months playing strokes on a practice pad before I ever touched a drum.  You can certainly learn stick control and paractice all sorts of patterns and drills to develop your hands.  You can't learn how to extract various tones from drums and cymbals on a practice pad; nor do you learn about the various ways to tune drums. But a pad was never intended to do that.  It is simply a surface that simulates the feel and rebound, in a manner, of playing on a real drum.

A pad is still a great aid for me in the dressing room.  It's a simple way of warming up before going on stage.  Because it's very portable you can play on a pad in your hotel room; on the tour bus; basically anywhere that's it's okay to use it without disturbing others.

So I view practice pads are useful tools for beginners, as well as, more accomplished drummers. 
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Ken Sanders
IBJAMN in Nashvile, TN
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