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I nedd some tips for heavy drumming (metal) - Drum Solo Artist

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Author Topic: I nedd some tips for heavy drumming (metal)  (Read 13664 times)
tombollig
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« on: February 10, 2007, 04:23:20 PM »

Hi!
I started playing in a new metal band, and i relaize that playing hard and stiff is not that easy as it looks.
Do you guys have any tips for a rock/metal drummer?
We are not death or scrimo, more sort of old school glam and hair rock.
There is also that Rimshot stroke thing when you hit both drum and rim, I wanted to know if there is a special or right way to use it.

Thanks!
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Little-Drummer-Boy
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« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2007, 09:59:06 PM »

Well im not sure what you mean by hard and stiff, but you have succeeded in giving me a dirty thought. For the rimshot there are two ways that I am farmiliar with. one is like you said it, hit the skin normally except hit the rim along with it, for #2, rest the tip of the stick on the skin(dont hit it) and while the tip is still resting on the skin slam the other end down to hit the rim. Hope this helps.
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wasted-years
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« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2007, 10:30:46 PM »

i used to play in an 80"s style rock band about 2 years ago and all you need is big shells and cymbals use like 20 inch rides in place where you might use like a 18 19 or 20 crash not saying its a must but its the best $wise because where you might spend more on biger cymbals and using more than one ride but they also last forever and when you gig at a place with a crappy sound guy who cares because your band plays at 11 to keep up with you
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PASHA
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« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2007, 02:13:13 PM »

My advice for the "heavy drumming" -> Grab a "Heavy Sticks" add some weight to your kick pedals and do a lot of Rim-shots all over the place! Lips sealed
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Tommystix
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« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2007, 07:01:59 PM »

hard n stiff?? do ya mean your stick grip?? I still like my Dave Weckl looser is better even for metal..helps increase my speed.. at first I had stix flyin everywhere.. just goota hold that grip!!!
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Smelly_granny
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« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2007, 08:15:44 AM »

hard n stiff?? do ya mean your stick grip??
heh heh Cheesy
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Desert_Drummer
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« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2007, 10:50:34 AM »

First off, don't dampen your heads too much so the drums can help you sound bigger and louder. Also, make sure your technique is good because you don't have to necessarily hit harder to get a bigger sound. Drums and drumheads can help you do what you have to do. If you're not in a speed metal band, don't stuff you bass drum too much as it will also have a bigger sound for you. I know that speed metal drumming requires a lot of notes with your feet so too much ring isn't good.

Also, endurance and strength training will assist you. I know it's so un-rock and roll to perhaps not party at all or party too much but drumming is very physical and you need all the strength and energy you can get.


Also, listen to the masters of this kind of music and also watch DVD's of how they play. Not all of them hit as hard as you think.

Good luck!
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Carthage
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« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2007, 05:28:44 AM »

Hi,

   Desert_Drummer's reply just before mine has some good advice.  You do need endurance and stamina to play heavy metal much more than other types of drumming, although there are other types that do occasionally require a lot of power, endurance, and stamina.   Playing heavy metal is like running a marathon and doing the mile at the same time.  You have to have speed and staying power for the long run.  I'm assuming that you would be playing more than one song in whatever kind of show you would be playing.   So, I would think it would be a good idea to make sure you are as healthy as possible, and exercising might be good too.

   I'm not sure what the "stiff" part refers to.  As I'm sure you know, you must be as loose and relaxed as possible to play well and especially to play for any extended period of time.    Playing loud and with power is a matter of technique not strength.  You don't have to lift up your arm (except for showmanship) to make a loud powerful rim shot.  You just need to flick your rist.

    If you notice most really good drummers have their snare drum level, not slanted or not slanted very much.  You make take exception to this with Buddy Rich because he had his snare in different positions during his life, and in recent years, it was level.  Of course Buddy could have played it upside down and still sound great.

     So, I would try leveling the snare and put it up high enough so that if you are playing with a matched grip, all you have to do is hold your stick over the drum and then give a quick flick of the wrist and you should be able to get a nice rim shot.  You should practice that until you can do it perfectly every time.  You can change the volume by changing how you make the flick.  Harder, faster, etc.  Also, if you are playing with a traditional grip, just do the same thing, and keep practicing it until you have it mastered.

     Make sure your snare is tuned correctly!  That can make all the difference between a good resounding rim shot and a bad one.

Don

       

   
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KenSanders
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« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2007, 08:15:17 AM »

I agree with some of the advice already posted:

The loose grip on the sticks is a relaxed feel not a tight or stiff feel.  Here's an analogy for you.

When you throw a ball your arms and wrists are loose.  Try to throw one with your arms and wrists stiff!  You'll have NO POWER compared to the loose and relaxed throw.  The same physics apply to the drum strokes.

Rimshots, are as previously explained, a stroke when the drum head and the drum hoop, are struck stimutaneously.  With a little practice it becomes easier to do.  Depending on the force of the stroke, this "rim shot" can be played at different volume levels.  But at your max force stroke, this is the loudest stroke you can produce from your snare drum.

The stroke that was described as placed the bead of the stick on the surface of the head and then striking the hoop with the stick (while the bead of the stick stays resting on the drum head) is called "cross stick".  It makes a distinct click sound with a little bit of the drum tone resonanting from the bead of the stick resting on the drum head. This is not a powerful sounding stroke like a rim shot.

I also concur with the tip from PASHA to try heavier sticks.  I would add to that, to find a heavier stick  that are comfortable for you.  If the sticks are too big for your hands to to hold and control, then they will not help you.

I also have a blog about louder volume playing.  You might read it and see if any of those suggestions offer any additional ideas for your own consideration.

Most of all...........practice. The drummers you admire spent years developing the ability to do the things that impress you.



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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2007, 08:25:10 AM »

The blog I cited above is:
How can I stop breaking sticks and cymbals and heads?
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2007, 07:44:42 PM »

The blog URL is:
http://www.drumsoloartist.com/live/blog/view/id_57/

Highly recommended to read this one... Actually ALL of the Kens Blogs!!
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