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KenSanders
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« on: February 24, 2013, 11:46:35 AM »

There are lots of great models on the market nowadays.  Seems like you can spend a lot of cash on certain models like Trick and Axis.

I have two Yamaha single pedals and two Yamaha double pedals.  They are all the "direct drive" models.  I chose them because the direct-drives push the footboard back on rebound, giving the pedal a quicker response. 

What's you favorite pedal?
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2013, 02:16:45 AM »

Thought at least some of you would be willing to share what your favorite pedal was.  There are so many new models and older models with improvements out now. 
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2013, 07:28:23 PM »

I find that I get so used to the feel of the pedals I use, that anyone else's feels really weird to me, even if its the same model of pedal, so I have to say that the ones I have are my favorites.

I have a DW 5000 double pedal on my good kit and an old Rogers pedal (I think they called it a swiv-o-matic) on my practice set.

The Rogers is an old strap drive job from the 60's or early 70's and is faster, but way less powerful, that the chain drive DW.

I use an old style felt beater on the Rogers and the factory beaters on the DW.

I also have the matching Rogers swiv-o-matic HH stand and it's pretty good too, but my DW 5500D HH stand blows it away in terms of stability and speed.
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KenSanders
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« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2013, 11:35:32 PM »

I advise everyone to use the pedals that work best for THEM.  As you point out, each person has a different feel and a different physiology. 
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Ken Sanders
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Carthage
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« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2013, 09:22:50 PM »

 Hi!

     I have uese a lot of different pedals, but I haven't used all of the different kinds.  From my experience, generally speaking, most good companys make decent pedals.  What it usually comes down to is how the pedal is set up.  Tension, angle of the beater, and so on.

     You can have the greatest pedal ever made, but if you don't have it adjusted correctly it won't mean a thing.  And of course as Ken mentions, it has to be adjusted to you.

     I have personally found adjusting the bass drum pedal the most frustrating thing about setting up a
drum set.  Where is the perfect adjustment?  I'm still looking for that perfect place.  Usually I just go with a set up the allows me to play the things I want to play always wondering if there is a better set up.  But, being basically lazy, I can only mess with that thing for so long, and then I just say "OK, that's good enough for Rock N' Roll" and get on with it.  Life is too short.

     But, having said that, I like the DW 5000 even though I have the DW 9000.  I've also got the Iron Cobra which is ok, but it broke.  I fixed it with wire.
The DW5000 (twin pedals by the way) has taken every punishment know to man as is still hanging in there.  The 9000 is great, but the 5000 seems easier
to play for me.   

     These are just my experiences, and I know other people have many more different expierences.  How about sharing them.
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Carthage
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« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2013, 09:53:45 PM »

 Hi,

     One more lttle thing I thought I would add.  I don't use straps although at one time I liked them.
The reason being, one night I was in the middle of a big drum solo.  I was cooking.  I was really burning
the stage down.  The whole audience was crowded around the stage digging it.  Suddenly, the strap on the bass drum pedal broke.

     The only thing I think that can equal the kind of feeling I had then was when the time I was trying to make love to my girlfriend and my father walked in the door.  This though was, I think,  was even worse.  Everything came to a stop.  One of the few times in my life I didn't know what to do.  I mean, what can you do in a situation like that.  Everyone around the stage looking at you and wondering why you stopped playing.  Everyone yelling for you to keep playing, and you just look at them and just - well, that's it - what!!!!

     I finally just mumbled something like "It's over" or maybe I growled it.  I don't remember exactly.  All remember for sure was that I was "pissed off", humiliated, disappointed, and a lot of other adjectives.  I did have a spare strap, so I spent about 10 - 15 minutes changing it, but by the time I got it fixed - well what are you going to do then.  The drum solo by that time was ancient history.  Using an old expresion, it was a complete "bummer".  I think what I hated most was that I let the audience down.  I had them at a fever pitch, and  then I (I was responsible) took everything away from them.  I let them down.  I felt bad about that.

     So, for that reason, I don't use straps.  Also, one more thing about straps.  They stretch.  After you use them a while, they get longer little by little (until they eventually break).  So, if you use a strap, be careful.
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AngusMacinnes
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« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2013, 10:27:19 PM »

My favorite is Ludwig Speed King.  I have used them from the 60's to present.
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KenSanders
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« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2013, 04:32:46 PM »

Carthage (Don),  I had similar experiences with straps and stopped using them for that reason.
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2013, 08:47:47 PM »

My first pedals were the Speed King, and they were awesome. At some point I was almost (quote me almost) able to get a double bass groove with that pedal. I remember listening to practice tapes going "How did I do that?" I also was rolling out Bonham style triplets with those things but that seems like a lifetime ago.  My next pedals were Yamaha double pedals and they were more awesome! I couldn't believe the freedom those pedals gave me playing and they truly were a workhorse variety of instrument. So kudos to you Ken, a very good choice indeed. But they were the ones the gave up on me in the first set of a 4 set night at the VFW. Man, I was very disturbed by this but thank god no one knew it but me. I love those pedals so much that I have bought used pedals to keep them alive & I still own them today. But when they broke I had no choice but to replace because of my schedule & I went to the store & immediately fell in love with the DW5000 double I played. Talk about a physiology, I NEVER changed anything once I brought them home. ( I didn't eat for 3 days buying them but..........) My preference is the DW series but I still have my backups that will not let me down again.  Grin
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KenSanders
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« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2013, 12:14:30 AM »

Cool Vista.......everyone has to find a pedal that works best for them.  I think back to the days when I used to break pedals, and have realized that it was before microphones for live playing were typically used.

Nowadays, I can concentrate more on the feel and set the pedal up for the fastest response because I can let the microphones handle the volume requirements.
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2013, 06:08:27 PM »

Thought at least some of you would be willing to share what your favorite pedal was.  There are so many new models and older models with improvements out now. 


Camco Chain Drive - simple straightforward and quite cheap too.
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« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2013, 07:29:19 PM »

Carthage - interesting comment about the DW 5000 vs the 9000 a few posts back. I have been thinking of maybe selling my 5000 double and upgrade to the 9000. I bought the 5000 as a "new" demo from a music store a few years ago and I like it, but it's the non-accelerator type and its taken quite a while to get used to. My though was that I'd prefer the 9000's adjustable action. Can you elaborate more on the difference in the feel of these 2 pedals? It seems from your comment that you prefer the 5000 - is this right? Do you see the 9000's adjustable sprocket feature as a benefit, or more of a pain to set up? Thanks
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