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Drumming cycles on the edge of the extreme - Drum Solo Artist

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Author Topic: Drumming cycles on the edge of the extreme  (Read 8070 times)
MSL5
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« on: November 02, 2011, 02:06:52 AM »

I believe the scales and arpeggios of drumming should be connected to the actual components of music: as musical motifs (or shorter rhythmic patterns), within longer phrases (phrase marks), crossing barlines, and all related to different note notations of pulse. (speed relationships).

I hear, (in one mans opinion), this is what actually occurs when awesome brilliant drummers are on fire, inspired, and improvising, and using for example a motif, a roll stroke.

The notation of the cycles is with single and double stroke rolls, and meant to be played with your hands, but the cycles also can be played with your feet.

All cycles can be played to different note notations of pulse. You will always know where the metronome pulse is in relation to the rhythm you are playing. Cycles that have two or more note notations of pulse, means you can practice metric modulations, and alter the speed of the rhythm your playing from different points in time.

The rhythmic patterns are not written as hand to foot coordination, but using your creativity, you can voice the cycles around a drum kit.

Any right or left hand can be played by your right or left foot, including unisons, for example: a right or left hand cymbal crash and your right foot together, or a pedal hi hat struck with a left or right hand while opened, and in unison with your kick drum, your right foot. Your foot can play on a pulse thatís lands between two notes, in the middle of a rhythm, a time division such as a triplet or quintuplet.

You can substitute your own sticking if you choose.

The upper case R and L is the first/primary attack (of the double stroke). The lower case r and l are the rebounds/secondary attack. These notes are not to be played softer than primary attacks. All doubles should be played evenly, with the same quality of attack.

The purpose of these files is not to play them for hours trying to memorize them. Ideas such as these come from an inspired musical context. A moment in time, which causes a spontaneous reaction to what is being heard and felt. I am amazed at the ability and depth of understanding, great artists have in hearing and feeling at such a scary level.

If you are interested .  .  .  .  . 

https://sites.google.com/site/polyrhythmschoolcom/ .

I synthesize number groupings with speed relationships and relate it all to pulse.
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KenSanders
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« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2011, 06:14:20 PM »

Very interesting.  I'll go to your link and study this some.  Thanks for sharing.
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Ken Sanders
IBJAMN in Nashvile, TN
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« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2011, 10:01:38 PM »

 Hi,

       I looked it over and went to your site.  It's all very intersting.  Unfortunately, I didn't understand half of what you are saying.  I feel your heart is in the right place, and that you have some good information to present to people in hopes of them coming to your site and school to further their rhythmic capabilites.

       But, as I read over your site, I had the strange feeling that either there are a couple of dudes like the "two wild and crazy guys" that used to be on Saturday night trying to speak English the best they can, or that it's all pretentious bullshit.  At least you should have a glossary of vocabulary so the average dude out there can understand what you're talking about.  Remember, we are drummers.

       The best I can glean from what you presented is that some drummers have reached such a high state of proficiency on the drums that they can play pretty much whatever they feel even if it doesn't fall into the structure of the time that's being played.

       To achieve that level is actually very simple.  All one has to do is practice their ass off every day for many years, play with as many bands and music styles as possible, and always keep pushing the envelope to express what they are feeling at the time they are playing.  (or be completely stoned)

       I personally don't think someone can learn that from books, but I think learning as much as you can from books,  getting experience, listening to all kinds of "good" music, and  anything esle that you can to do to improve your playing can assist in reaching that level of playing.

      What finally gives someone the ability to play as you say "Scary" is in the end one's own creative ability assuming that they do have the chops.  That, you can't teach.  That's why some people with less technical ability can play better than people who are technically superior to them.  It comes down to what is most important in playing, and that is the FEELING.  Without feeling, you just have a bunch of notes.

      I listended to the music on your site, and the drums although very technical, don't have any feeling.  The drums sound like drum machines.  That is also one of the problems with todays music.  It's very technical, smooth, and intricate, but it seems like maybe it would suit R2D2 and threepio more than a simple person like myself.

      Having said all that, I wish you the best and hope a lot of drummers benefit from your school.
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KenSanders
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« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2012, 08:12:24 PM »

MSL5,

I'd like to hear some recorded examples of what you're meaning by "Cycles that have two or more note notations of pulse, means you can practice metric modulations, and alter the speed of the rhythm your playing from different points in time."

I'm not sure.......maybe I am oversimplfying the concept you are describing.  I have seen Buddy Rich, Louie Bellson, Joe Morello do what I believe you are discussing.  The times I was able to talk to Buddy Rich he often said everything I do and feel is just a series of single and double strokes (one of his standard lines about drumming).  Yes, he was being his own sarcastic self.  But ironically, it was also a simple truth about drumming.

Here's a simple example of a Keith Carlock trademark lick that comes to mind.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45WGICAzIxU&list=UUy1VjEC15TF1hQWKLLPXV_w&index=3&feature=plcp
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Ken Sanders
IBJAMN in Nashvile, TN
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« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2013, 03:01:47 AM »

Anyone else looked into this?  Comments?
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Ken Sanders
IBJAMN in Nashvile, TN
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