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Author Topic: If you are just starting your drumming studies.....  (Read 16658 times)
KenSanders
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« on: May 02, 2008, 04:45:24 PM »


I received an email from a young man who is interested in learning drums he wanted some advice about getting started.  Wink

My standard advice to persons with a genuine interest in learning to play is to seek out a capable and reputable teacher if that is “at all” possible.  That is just such a good way to get started on a structured path to mastering the basic skills….which I contend includes the ability to read music.   Notice that I didn’t mention any specifiic musical instrument…..that’s because this applies to any musical instrument.  A good teacher in the beginning will make a big difference later.  Cool

Now, I realize that not all of the successful drummers have the ability to read music.  But if you are starting out…..and you are serious…..then why not have the advantage of being able to read in your arsenal of skills?  It certainly makes it easier to progress into more advanced studies later.  Besides, if a professional drummer is a well-rounded musician and not a “one-trick pony”, then you need to be able to read music.  Huh

 
I also advised him to check out the Drum Solo Artist Website.  Here’s part of what I wrote about that:

Check out features like the DSA Techniques and the DSA Library where you will find a lot of information about instructional materials and videos.  Several of the DSA Blogs have topics of general interest, as well as, tips about many interesting drumming and performance situations.  The DSA Forum and the DSA Groups are places for comments, questions, answers and opinions.

There are some interesting drum solos to listen to in the DSA Drum Solo section and the Drummers List has profiles of many professional drummers who have received recognition for their performance ability.

So, with all of that said, you may want to spend some time just going through the really cool features of the DSA website.


Well, I just wanted to share some of my thoughts about this, in case you know of someone wanting to start serious studies too. 
   Smiley
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2008, 02:47:19 PM »

Thanks a lot Ken Wink - Much appreciated!
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KenSanders
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« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2008, 09:58:05 PM »

I was glad to hear that the New York Board of Zoning Appeals granted your request.

REFERENCE http://www.drumsoloartist.com/live/drumforum/index.php/topic,561.0.htmlA N D

I still want to know how that new 28” concert bass drum with 144 strand snares on one side and fifty-six 4” copper nails embedded in the batter side bearing edge sounded when you added it to "Fort PASHA"
 Cheesy

It has to be the deepest snare sound E V E R !
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2008, 10:28:22 PM »

 Grin Grin Yep, I love having LOTS of drums in my set!!!


The only problem that is left to solve, is to be able to afford having ALL of them on every gig I make!! Grin Grin


HERE I COME WITH MY TRUCKS OF DRUM TOYS!!!
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lucas
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2011, 04:52:17 PM »

Hi Ken,
Agree with all you have said.
Not sure if its relevant now, but, back in the day (late 60s) you bought a kit and listened very carefully to records (remember them) and tried to work out what the drummer was playing.
Usually this meant you came up with your version of the groove and in some cases gave you a unique style.
I dont recall drum tutors  back in the day, If you wanted to play you started a band with your mates and the only practice I got was band rehersals, once a week.
Sounds very basic and almost backward now but thats the way it was.
I am surprised any of us managed to progress really, but I enjoyed it.
Was it similar in the states back then?

. Undecided
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KenSanders
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« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2011, 08:07:13 PM »

Hey Lucas,

I certainly agree that what you described.  Your are right, it has been a familiar learning scenario for so many drummers.  I know that I spent hours listening to recordings and learning how to play the drum parts on the tunes that were performed by bands I was working with back in those days.  Whenever I got to go to a concert I would always try to take binoculars and watch what the drummer was doing.  Cheesy

This thread was started to advise today's beginning drummers and it is the same adice I would offer  a beginning golfer today.  That is simply to get a teacher to get you equipped with the basics.  That gets you started with a good solid foundation.  You need that solid foundation to build upon.

If beginning drummers develop bad habits and THEN seek assistance from a teacher, the process of getting those remedied and the fundamentals established is even more complicated. Here in the USA many major cities have had drum teachers for eighty or more years, Although that doesn't mean that every aspiring student had access to one. I remember I studied from books like Stick Control and the Jim Chapin Method and didn't have a teacher.  Today there are so many really great videos, so the paradigm has had significant changes since the 50's and 60's.

Anyway, today's beginning drummers are so fortunate to have such an amazing amout of learning materials available. 

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Ken Sanders
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lucas
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« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2011, 04:20:22 PM »

Hi Ken,

Thought the Yanks would be miles ahead with qualified drum teachers years ago.
I have been mulling this over since I returned to drumming 6 months ago.

I suppose the 60s was unique in Britain as it seems the pop/rock musicians were making it up as they went along.
I had no formal training at all, not even a book. I played what came naturally. I was never fast or technical and knew nothing of practice methods.
I only ever played in originals bands so came up with my own grooves.
When I left my last band, in 82, they auditioned for a new drummer and got the best guy available who was technically very good, much better than me I have to say.
After two rehersals he left and the band split. Aparently he could not grasp the parts I had played and struggled with the time signature changes.
In retrospect my proudest moment.

What I am trying to say,In a roundabout way, Is, that sometimes not having any formal training or mastery of an instrument means you come up with something unexpected.

Just an observation.

 Grin
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Johnathan
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« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2011, 09:14:15 PM »

"What I am trying to say,In a roundabout way, Is, that sometimes not having any formal training or mastery of an instrument means you come up with something unexpected".


Very True!
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KenSanders
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« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2011, 09:59:12 PM »

Yes, originally is a treasured element in the art form we call music. But I don't think it pours out by accident.  On the contrary, I believe it comes imagination and a desire to try things out of the realms of whatever the current "norm" is.

I'm not sure if my own "drum set" training meets everyone's definition of formal or not. 

I played in high school and college bands.....but yet I taught myself to play drums and how to read music (mostly by reading through beginner piano books),  The high school band director spent all of his time teaching kids how to play horns, but he didn't know squat about drums or how to teach anyone to play them. 

My beginning studies were listening to records, watching drummers play "live", talking to professional drummers (thank God I live in Nashville for that) and working through the Jim Chapin Drum Set Method book.  So, I consider myself "self-taught"  on drums.  I'm also "self-taught" on keyboards, guitar, bass and harmonica.   Roll Eyes

If you are lucky to "go big-time" with an original music band, then you can maybe join the ranks of the likes of Ringo and Moon or Bonzo.  I admire and envy guys who have been able to do that.  They never had to compete in the skills market that I do, and to be able to basically perform a variety of styles other that just whatever that felt like playing.

The guys around here have similiar stories to mine (Paul Liem, Eddie Bayers, Tommy Wells, Trey Grey, Will Denton, Billy West, to name a few).

I'm not writing to say "agree" or "disagree" with what's been posted above, but just too say that my "formal" training could be basically classified as "home schooled".    Cheesy


 
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Ken Sanders
IBJAMN in Nashvile, TN
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