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24" Crash/Ride - Drum Solo Artist

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Author Topic: 24" Crash/Ride  (Read 7173 times)
KenSanders
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« on: October 21, 2010, 07:32:22 PM »

I had been listening to some of the old Elton John recordings and enjoying the sound of that 24” cymbal with rivets that Nigel Olsen used on so many hit tunes and for live performances, as well.  Cool

I got a 24” Paiste Giant Beat cymbal and had the staff at Fork’s Drum Closet install 8 rivets one and a half inches from the edge for maximum vibration of the rivets.  I have been having a blast using this cymbal in a classic rock/oldies act.  I have placed it where I normally have my Swish cymbal (which wasn’t working out for me in this particular genre).  A light stroke sets off a fairly long sustaining rivets effect.  It also works as a special purpose crash/ride too.  Maybe it’s not something anyone else would like, but it is rocking my world.  Roll Eyes

I still use my Chinas and Swishes for my Jazz and Fusion performances, but this new cymbal successfully achieved that Nigel Olsen sound that I was wanting to create for this act.

For those who are interested, Nigel actually uses a 24” Paiste 2002 Ride in his live set-up.  I backed off a bit on the cymbal weight by choosing the 24” Giant Beat cymbal which is a thinner multi-purpose cymbal.  I believe the retro sound of the Giant Beat series is closer to the sound I was hearing on the recordings.  Wink
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2010, 04:44:59 PM »

Are the rivets in close proximation to each other, or are they equaly spaced across the diameter?
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KenSanders
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« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2010, 12:49:16 AM »

Hey Tomm,

The rivets are evenly spaced around the circumference of the cymbal and installed one and a half inches from the edge.

I am absolutely loving this retro sound.  Here is a Paiste link with some sound samples of this 24" monster.  Of course, these samples do not use a cymbal with the rivets, but you can get an idea of the cymbal's rather unique sound palate. 

http://www.paiste.com/e/cymbals.php?category=7&family=7&action=category&menuid=270
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Ken Sanders
IBJAMN in Nashvile, TN
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« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2010, 01:33:39 AM »

I am going out for some dates with an act that is doing an Elvis in Las Vegas show and a Blues Brother type show.  My typical cymbal set-ups didn't quite nail the sound I thought was needed.
  Huh

The shows are going to be on stages in venues with fairly large club seating, but none in typical concert areas.  In rehearsals I was trying to find a cymbal set that fit the music ...especially that essential Ron Tut energized vibe.  Here is what I finally selected from the cob webs of the old drum closet:

14" Paiste 2002 Sound Edge Hi Hats
2 - 20" Paiste 2002 Crashes (right and left main crashes)
18" Paiste Thin Crash (for a quick accent crash)
22" Paiste 2002 Ride
24" Paiste Giant Beat Multi with 8 rivets

There's just a very classic rock and roll sound associated with these 2002 cymbals.  As much as I love the sound characteristics of the Signature, Traditionals, and Dark Energy models (all Signature Bronze Alloy) for the work I do with my own bands......the 2002 models have a very different alloy with a different type shimmer and tone that just nails that 60's and 70's vibe.  Cheesy

I guess this post is just to share some of the fun I enjoy gearing up for these different type gigs. I wish I had thought more about these cymbals when we did the 50's-60's revues last Spring when we were doing dates in the South East performing at vintage car shows. I believe that a scaled down version of what I mentioned above would have nailed it.  Roll Eyes




 
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2010, 05:19:23 PM »

I know what you mean about the sounds of particular eras.  Sounds like you are going to reap the benifits of  well thought out equipment plans.  Good music always starts with a good plan.  Congrats on the opportunity.  I'm sure you will deliver the goods that the band was searching for when they hired you.
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KenSanders
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« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2010, 09:12:47 PM »

Great to hear from you Tomm.  I've missed seeing your posts lately.

Back to the thread topic....when we think of  getting appropriate sounds,  we usually think of only the drum sounds.  I can usually change snare drums, and do some tuning adjustments on the other drums and get a very workable drum sound.  Cymbals however, reamain  exactly what they are.  Roll Eyes

Example? Well imagine trying to do justice to a Beatles show with a heavy metal model ride cymbal and power crashes.  See?  Bet you can agree that sometimes it does matter what cymbals you choose.

Whereas, a lot of the Forum readers are doing original material or work with only one genre of music, I get hired quite often to make certain moods and colors happen.  I believe it is totaly cool to do original tunes or to focus your energies on a particular style......  I always say do whatever rocks your world not mine.   Wink

As for me, I have to cover a lot of genre bases to stay busy in this town.  So, my drum and cymbal sounds might vary somewhat from gig to gig.  That's just my niche.  The cymbals and snare drums are, for me, the most frequently changed aspect of my working kits. I just go for making the drum and cymbal sounds that seem to fit the music best.

There's no real message in this post....just me sharing some personal insights.

 Grin
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2010, 09:10:32 PM »

Always look forward to your posts, I just don't get much" sit down to it" time these days.  I see more than I get the chance to acknowledge and reply to, but as usual your posts are informative and interesting.  I also find myself turning a little green with envy from time to time, but I never begrudge your accomplishments.  I know you work hard and desearve everything you get for it.

I agree with your take on the cymbals being a key in delivering what you want to hear, which is what you know everyone expects to hear without them really knowing it....lol
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KenSanders
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« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2010, 10:41:34 PM »

Thanks for the comments Tomm.

You know whether it's keyboard settings, bass guitar settings, or guitar settings....all working musicians find the best tones and sounds that fit the music.  Why shouldn't drummers do the same thing?
 Wink
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Ken Sanders
IBJAMN in Nashvile, TN
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