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What kind of hardware works best for YOU? - Drum Solo Artist

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Author Topic: What kind of hardware works best for YOU?  (Read 14566 times)
KenSanders
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« on: June 08, 2009, 07:29:39 PM »

It seems like the drum hardware manufacturers have a full array of hardware choices these days.  I think that’s a good thing for all of us.

Today, you can buy a double-braced cymbal stand that extends to almost seven feet, with a boom and counter weight.  Or you can buy a very light flush-based stand that weights about 3 or 4 pounds.  Or you can buy something in between those parameters.

I think I am in the “medium weight hardware category” with the drum hardware I use today.  All of my stands are single-braced, but not “flush-based”.  That includes my hi-hat stands and snare drum stands too.  The only exception are my Roc N Soc thrones. 

The hardware I have chosen permits a lot of options since the series (Yamaha 700) and tubing diameters allow me to change things around very easily.  With these stands I can also use clamps to add other hardware items without any concerns about turning the stands over.   Another important factor for me is that the packing and transport weight is significantly lighter than it would be if I was using the double-braced “heavier duty” model hardware.

It just depends on how you set your kit(s) up and what your individual needs require.  I believe there are very practical hardware solutions for everyone today.

So how about it readers?  Do you prefer light, medium, or heavy.  Do you ever knock stands over?……or have the wind blow stands over?……or have you decided to “lighten your load” with light or medium weight hardware?



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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2009, 04:29:26 PM »

I have been using a Gibralter Rack for about a year, It is heavier to carry but much more stable than seperate stands, and actually breaks down faster than stands.
I haave had cymbal stands fall while trying to choke them after a hit (try to grab a cymbal while it is moving and miss)
I use a double brace pearl snare stand and a Tama throne - with a backrest.
I just bought a new Hi Hat stand Mapex/janus Transmission it is a single pedal that can operatethe hi hat or by shifting the pedal to the right operate a bass pedal, I have not used it yet.
Randy
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KenSanders
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« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2009, 11:30:32 PM »

In his post, Pacrat87 mentioned his use of a Gibralter rack.

I have a blog about racks and stands for readers who may be interested.

http://www.drumsoloartist.com/live/blog/view/id_63/title_racks-or-stands/
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2010, 04:00:19 AM »

I prefer medium to heavy weight stands. I don't care for the "flat bottom" stands at all. I use all double braced stands. I also only get boom stands with counterweights these days. I just feel my cymbals and drums are more secure on these kinds of stands. They stand up to the rigors of gigging much better than lightweight stands. In reality there's nothing wrong with lightweight or single braced stands I just prefer the heavier weight gear.   T
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KenSanders
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« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2010, 12:39:03 PM »

The initial purpose for heavy weight drum hardware (pioneered by Tama) was designed for touring drummers.  The increased weight provided substantially more stabilty in outdoor venues where the wind could blow over a cymbal stand. The design was soon also used for snare drum stands, tom stands, and hi hat pedal stands.  A boom arm and counter weights were added to provide extra "reach" for mega kits used by Tama drummers like Billy Cobham and Simmon Phillips. Many drummers don't need the extra weight for securing their drum set ups, so most drum companies have now engineered lighter weight alternatives.

Some drummers may find it interesting that at the peak of the heavy hardware race, Tama developed models with aluminum components that provided the tripod width for stability without as much weight.   Roll Eyes

Today, I could have close to two hundred pounds of hardware if I used all double braced, large diameter options. However, using medium weight selections, I have a hardward load of about 88 pounds nowadays.  That's a saver for me.  Not only with what I have to transport, but more weight results in more fuel consumption  Shocked. Plus, more bulk requires more cases, since I don't want to have anything I can't pick up by myself  Wink.

Hardware should be a sensable choice of what you need and what you are comfortable with. It's a totally personal choice and we should all be glad that we have an incredible array of models to choose from now.
 
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2011, 10:55:53 AM »

It has been a while since we discussed the choice of either stand mounted drum hardware or rack mounted drum hardware.  There is actually a third option, which is “spanner tubes” that allow rack mount-type clamps to be used in combination with traditional tripod stands instead of rack upright supports.  Companies like Gibraltar have quite an assortmernt of those fittings available now.  You can create your own customized array of hardware; one that best suits your desired set-up.  I am sure that some of our readers have been using this third alternative.  Maybe they will share some pictures with us. 
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2011, 01:48:48 PM »

This is the first I have heard of the third type of hardware.  I'm only going to imagine what it may be like for a few minutes because I'm going to Google (or something) it.  Sounds interesting and I'm near healed enough from my surgery to start practicing again.  I have full intentions of getting back out into the field again this time, and I'm thinking these tubes could be a new advantage for that.  If they are not too expensive.
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KenSanders
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« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2011, 03:52:24 PM »

Tomm,

Check this and other similar items out.

http://www.gibraltarhardware.com/?fa=detail&mid=2288&sid=615&cid=31

Click on the kits shown in the small illustrations for views of some applications of the "hybrid" idea.


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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2011, 07:13:15 PM »

That is some pretty incredible  and versatile hardware.
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KenSanders
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« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2013, 03:09:23 AM »

Well Tomm, did you add some componets to your set-up?  Pictures?
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Ken Sanders
IBJAMN in Nashvile, TN
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