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Who are the truly great drummers? - Drum Solo Artist

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Carthage
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« Reply #25 on: May 19, 2009, 08:45:07 AM »

Hi,

       Another great drumming legend is Connie Kay.  His playing is very subdued although he could rise to the occasion when need be.  He is the ultimate in smooth.  Playing the right thing at the right time to give the band exactly what was needed in order for the music to be it's best.

       Connie played with various artists as the other drummers did.  Miles Davis, Charlie Parker, Stan Getz, and so on.  But he found his home in 1955 when he replaced Kenny Klarke as dummer for the Modern Jazz Quartet (MJQ).  He stayed with them right up until the end in 1994.  So a little arithmetic will tell you they played together for 39 years. 

       Yes, there was a final concert November 25, 1974.  But, no explanation is needed, I believe, to explain them still playing in 1994.  Just like there is no need to explain the Rollings Stones hundreds of final tours.

       There is an amazing compilation of music that can let you hear a real master on the drums, but one I like is "Pyramid" from the cd 'Pyramid'.  It's available on cd now and is a truly amazing work of art.  Connie is so musical and emits so much control over the drums, it shows what a true artist is capable of.

       It was first released in 1960 right when they were in their prime.  Dig it.

The members of MJQ are:   John Lewis - Piano
                                        Percy Heath - bass
                                        Milt Jackson - Vibes
                                        Connie Kay - Drums

Don
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« Reply #26 on: May 30, 2009, 03:36:13 AM »

Hi,

       Another great drummer is Grady Tate.  He, as the others, has played with many musicians and is a seasoned veteran that should be listened to.  Having played with such greats as Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Jimmy Smith, Miles Davis, Roland Kirk, and so on, he brings his unique mastery of the drums to the playing field.

       Again, I reiterate that the more you know, the better you can play.  (That's of course you are seriously making a true endeavor to constantly improve yourself) One of the best ways to learn more is by listening.  The better the music you listen to, the better you can become. 

       An excellent cd to listen to that will give you a great example of Grady's playing is Oliver Nelson's "More Blues and the Abstract Truth".  A good song, and remember on any cd given all the songs are good, to listen to is the song 'Blues and the Abstract Truth'.

       This cd is available.

The members are:  Oliver Nelson - Orchestration, arranger   
                             Ben Webster - Sax (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
                             Daniel Moore - Trumpet
                             Danny Moore - Trumpet
                             Thad Jones - Trumpet
                             Ben Webster - Sax (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
                             Pepper Adams - Sax (Baritone)
                             Phil Bodner - Horn (English), Sax (Tenor)
                             Phil Woods - Sax (Alto)
                             Roger Kellaway - Piano
                             Richard David - Bass
                             Grady Tate - Drums
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« Reply #27 on: June 19, 2009, 02:34:38 PM »

Many of you will not agree but I think Keith Moon is one of the greats, not so much form a technical aspect but more so in how he played.  Very few can relpicate Keith's style, you simply have to be Keith to do what he did on the kit and many drummers are who they are today because of Keith's style.

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« Reply #28 on: June 20, 2009, 01:13:01 PM »

I agree that Keith Moon was a fantastic drummer with a unique approach to playing a drum kit.  He was the perfect drummer for the musical styles and the "Mod" image the members of the WHO wanted to exemplify.

In my opinion, Keith Moon was a musical stylist performing with a group that was happy to let him play whatever he felt fit the song.  He probably would not have worked out as well for other bands of the time (Beatles, Rolling Stones, Kinks, Hollies, etc.) because he needed to be "Keith" and not resticted at all.

Rather than be placed into a restrictive role, Keith was able to break free of those bonds and go wild.  Cheesy To be able to do that, you must be in a band that can handle that.  People like Neil Peart are present day examples of being in bands that can handle a more explosive drum style.  Wink



 
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #29 on: June 23, 2009, 07:41:33 AM »

Hi,

      Another great drummer is Tony Williams.  He started playing with Miles Davis when he was 17 in 1963.  True fusion music started with Miles Davis, and it came about because of Tony's "over the top" playing.  So, I guess Tony should be credited with being the impetus from which fusion music was created.

      He went on to form "Lifetime" which had a profoung effect on the music world.  In a quote by Miles Davis, he said that Tony "just blew my f__king mind he was so bad".  You can't get any higher praise than that.  (Of course, for those of you who don't know who Miles Davis is, you better start doing some serious homework if you want to be a musician)

      Tony is THE polyryhthm "MAN".  It's been said that he was a cross between Art Blakey, Philley Joe Jones, Roy Haynes, and Max Roach.  Also, if you listen carefully, you can hear him throw in a few Buddy Rich licks now and then.

       Tony played with a finesse, power, creativeness, dynamics, drive, emotion, energy, and class, that I haven't heard any new drummers emulate.  It is true, there are some really great drummers out there today, but you have to knock off a few of those adjectives when describing them.  In my opinion, there is no drummer today that can play like Tony, although there are some amazing technicians who can play double parradiddles upside down, backwards, with triple wingdingies with there little toe, but they still can't play like Tony.

       Also, with the exception of a few people like Tony MacAlpine and Dave Weckl, most fusion today sounds like glorified pop music.   (My Opinion)

       Actually, I'm not able to do justice to Tony.  For those of you who have never heard him, you need to, right now!

       Another quote from Miles Davis "there ain't but one Tony Williams when it comes to playing the drums.  There was nobody like him before or since.  He's just a motherf__ker."

       A little help for those not familiar with Miles Davis, some musicians that came out of his fusion
groups are:  John McLaughlin, Chick Corea, Kieth Jarrett, Dave Holland, Jackie DeJohnette ( a great drummer coming in the future) and  many others.

      A very good example of Tony's playing is on the song "Dark Prince- live" from the cd 'Trio of Doom'.

The member are:      Tony Williams - drums
                               Jaco Pastorius - bass
                               John McLaughlin - guitar

      It is interesting to note that when looking for cds by individuals like Tony Williams and other players, you will find that they played on many cds as sidemen.  If you look for them under their names, you will never find them.  There are lots of cds with Tony Williams on them that most people don't even know about.  You have to hunt throught the whole jazz music selection at a second hand shop to find them. 
 
      A few examples of what I mean are: 

            1.  Una Mas -  Kenny Dorham - trumpet
                                 Joe Henderson - tenor sax
                                 Herbie Hancock - piano
                                 Butch Warren - bass
                                 Tony Williams - drums
           
            2.  Empyrean Isles - Freddie Hubbard - cornet
                                          Herbie Hancock - piano
                                          Ron Carter - bass
                                          Tony Williams - drums
   
            3.  Herbie Hancock Trio with Ron Carter + Tony Williams
                                          Herbie Hancock - piano
                                          Ron Carter - bass
                                          Tony Williams - drums

It should be noted in the early years, he is credited as Anthony Williams, so if you see any cds with that name, that's him.  You can find countless cds with other drummers on them that you won't find by checking under their names.  So, the next time you go cd hunting (and of course I'm not refering to people who already know this), check everything.  You'll be surprised.

Don



     
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KenSanders
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« Reply #30 on: June 24, 2009, 08:09:06 PM »

Don,

Hear, hear.

I agree Tony Williams was one of the most incredible drummers I ever heard.  He certainly did not limit his playing to any one style or influence.  He built upon his adventurous immagination and the results were both remarkable and original.
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #31 on: June 25, 2009, 11:25:47 AM »

Here's a clip with Buddy Rich commenting about the matched grip.  Whether you agree or not (and I use both the traditional grip and the matched grip), it's worth a look.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/v0V4Aqs2D48&amp;ap=%2526fmt%3D18&amp;rel=0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/v/v0V4Aqs2D48&amp;ap=%2526fmt%3D18&amp;rel=0</a>
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Ken Sanders
IBJAMN in Nashvile, TN
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