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Mitch Mitchell - Drum Solo Artist

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kratos2596
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« on: November 19, 2008, 10:20:19 AM »

Hey, anyone out there have anything to say about the passing of Hendrix guitarist Mitch Mitchell.  He was fantastic and deserves some credit.
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KenSanders
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2008, 12:31:00 PM »

Mitch Mitchell was the Jimi Henddrix Experience drummer, not a gutarist.  When Chad Chandler put the group together, he wanted a drummer with a lot of energy and a unique style.  In a era where many pop music drummers were playing very conservative drum parts to top 40 songs, Mitch Mitchell came on like a machine gun.

I remember the first time I heard their recording of "Fire", I thought "man it's the drum part that is making this song rock so hard".

I do list him in one of my blogs, as an innovator. You are correct, Mitch Mitchell deserves a lot of credit from drummers who, know it or not, were influenced by his stylings.
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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2008, 08:44:31 PM »

Power trios are not possible without an outstanding drummer.  Mitch was  the first successful power trio drummer.  I know Jimi and Noel were very good at guitar and bass, and their compositions were pioneering at the least, but they would not have megged out like they did with anyone less than Mitch Mitchell.  His work on the Experience album was inspiring to every drummer that heard it.
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« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2008, 09:25:08 AM »

Hi,

      He played with feeling, taste, drive, power, and technique.  That's a combination you don't find today too often.  He and Ginger pretty much set the pace for everyone in rock in those days.

      I certainly have been influenced by him and include him as one of the great drummers.  I'll miss him.

Don 
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« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2008, 10:42:57 AM »

I must admit, with deep regret, I don't know of anything he was involved in after Jimi's death.  I would really appreciate anything anyone knows about Mitch and could pass on here.
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« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2009, 12:29:43 AM »

I just have to get my previous request back on the top of the board.  Anyone know what Mitch worked on or at after the Hendrix experience he created?
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KenSanders
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« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2009, 03:17:29 PM »


SOURCE:    WIKIPEDIA   Cool


Post-Hendrix

After Hendrix's death, Mitchell (along with engineer Eddie Kramer) finished production work on multiple incomplete Hendrix recordings, resulting in posthumous releases such as "The Cry of Love" and "Rainbow Bridge". In 1972, he teamed up with guitarists April Lawton and Mike Pinera (who would later go on to join Iron Butterfly) to form the quite innovative act Ramatam. They recorded one album and were Emerson, Lake & Palmer's opening act at a number of concerts. Interestingly, Mitchell had been offered the drum spot in ELP during 1970, but turned it down in favour of playing with Hendrix. Ramatam never achieved commercial success and Mitchell left the act before their second LP release. Mitchell also performed in some concerts with Terry Reid, Jack Bruce, and Jeff Beck (substituting for drummer Cozy Powell, then sick).

According to Eddie Kramer's book Hendrix: Setting the Record Straight, Michael Jeffery, Hendrix's manager, an innovator in getting Hendrix promoted and established, relegated both Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding to the status of mere paid employees without an ownership share in future revenues. This limited their earnings to a very low rate and led to Mitchell and Redding being largely excluded from sharing in future revenues generated from their work with The Jimi Hendrix Experience. This arrangement pressured Mitchell in the mid-1970s to sell a prized Hendrix guitar. In addition, he sold his small legal claim to future Hendrix record sales for a sum reported to be in the range of $200,000. In 1974, he auditioned for Paul McCartney's band Wings, but was turned down in favour of drummer Geoff Britton.

For the rest of the '70s through to the '90s, Mitchell continued to perform and occasionally record although essentially doing so under the radar of most of his previous fans. He kept reasonably busy doing occasional session work (such as Junior Brown's "Long Walk Back" album) as well as participating in various Hendrix-related recordings, videos, and interviews.

In 1999, Mitchell appeared on the late Bruce Cameron's album Midnight Daydream that included other Hendrix alumni Billy Cox and Buddy Miles along with Jack Bruce, with whom Mitchell had worked after Hendrix's death. Mitchell, seemingly in an attempt to satisfy the most enthusiastic fans of his drum work with Hendrix, even played a series of live shows with the Hendrix emulator Randy Hansen. Most recently, he was part of the Gypsy Sun Experience, along with former Hendrix bassist Billy Cox and guitarist Gary Serkin. He entered semi-retirement living in Europe.


Death
His last days were spent celebrating the music and legacy of Jimi Hendrix on the 2008 Experience Hendrix Tour. For nearly four weeks the tour travelled coast to coast in an 18-city tour in the US, finishing in Portland.[4] In addition to Mitchell, the tour featured Buddy Guy, Jonny Lang, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Eric Johnson, Cesar Rosas, David Hidalgo, Aerosmith's Brad Whitford, Hubert Sumlin, Chris Layton as well as Eric Gales and Mato Nanji. Five days after the tour ended Mitchell was found dead at approximately 3 AM 12 November in his room at the Benson Hotel in downtown Portland.[5] Following medical tests, it was revealed by the Multnomah County Medical Examiner's Office that Mitchell had died in his sleep of natural causes. [6] [7] He was the last surviving member of the original Jimi Hendrix Experience. Mitchell was to leave Portland on Wednesday, November 12, and return to his home in England.


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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2009, 09:17:12 PM »

Thanks Ken, that was a good find.  I appreciate it.
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« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2009, 01:44:36 AM »

Hey guys, I would just like to add, that if you listen to some of Mitch's fills, you can hear strong blues and jazz elements shining through. I think mitch's combining jazz fills in to one of the first Rock groups ever created is extremely inovative. RIP.
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« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2009, 03:34:24 PM »

It is sad that exploitation of talented musicians, who actually are a large part of the "STAR'S" sound and success; is often a harsh reality of the music business.  So many of the drummers, whose playing we admire, have been the victims of such greed.  Sadly, Mitch Mitchell is a example.

"According to Eddie Kramer's book Hendrix: Setting the Record Straight, Michael Jeffery, Hendrix's manager, an innovator in getting Hendrix promoted and established, relegated both Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding to the status of mere paid employees without an ownership share in future revenues.

This limited their earnings to a very low rate and led to Mitchell and Redding being largely excluded from sharing in future revenues generated from their work with The Jimi Hendrix Experience. This arrangement pressured Mitchell in the mid-1970s to sell a prized Hendrix guitar. In addition, he sold his small legal claim to future Hendrix record sales for a sum reported to be in the range of $200,000. In 1974, he auditioned for Paul McCartney's band Wings, but was turned down in favour of drummer Geoff Britton."



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Ken Sanders
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