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njwoods
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« on: October 19, 2007, 12:11:44 AM »

I played with a band (local/ hobby)  in the early 80's doing covers.  Bought a 5 pc kit (wow, were they expensive!), learned a song by playing along multiple times and was ready to go.

As life would have it, spent 23 yrs without picking up a drum stick, and have decided to get back into it.  This time, no hobby, would like to get good enough to find a local band that plays regularly in my area. 

Bought a kit & heard about practicing my rudiments.  Had never heard the word before!  SSSOOOOOO - exactly how important to an amateur drummer are the rudiments.  Should I be able to teach them, or are they just a handy thing to know for those who don't want to be a rockstar?   Huh

Thanks
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PASHA
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« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2007, 02:18:02 AM »

Rudiments definitely help a lot, and if you are playing professionally, or semi-professionally, than you can not survive without practicing them... But if you are playing for the fun of it, than why do you even care? - Just get out there, grab your drumsticks and have FUN!! Wink
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jazzpolice
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« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2007, 11:58:29 AM »

Re: Rudiments.....Greetings from Australia! Hi, I just only joined this forum. My start was in school marching band, worked on snare rudiments for a year until got my first kit (a 2nd hand Rogers set which I STILL use now n then). Rudiments are like your building blocks for like anything you play. As daunting as looking at at all 40 PAS (percussion arts society) rudiments might be, remember that there are only 4 basic "building blocks" when it comes to drum strokes....Singles, Doubles, Flams and Drag strokes. The 40 PAS rudiments are combinations of these. And even if you say "stuff it, can't be bothered", well if you play a 1/16th note fill from your snare to your tom, you will at least be playing single strokes.Learn a new rudiment or two a week and you'll be surprised as to how well you'll accummulate such control with your hands and feet.....but this only comes with regular practice, mind you. Good luck and happy drumming! Cheesy
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KenSanders
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« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2007, 08:53:04 PM »

I agree with jazzpolice.  Rudiments are basically blocking blocks, and a structured way to practice the various strokes and patterns for your hands.   Drum set players need to also practice dynamics, keeping steady time, and bass drum/hit hat work.

In my opinion, although not necessarily essential, rudiments can be extremely valuable for developing stick and stroke control.

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Ken Sanders
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« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2008, 03:06:09 PM »

Rudiments are the basic pieces that you use in drumming to make music, itís the same way that a wind instruments or melodic instruments have notes and they put those notes together into scales and then the scales became music eventually. This is the same thing, these are the little pieces that we put together when we play drums.  Wink
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Ani-mal
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2008, 09:23:15 AM »

Rudiments......Watch Buddy Rich and you will see how much rudiments can do for you in your overall playing ability.  I only wish I never left my rudiments behind , so to speak.  I mean to say that once you know them, you know them. But to stay consistantly working on them and using them as a practice technique and excersises would do nothing but make you all that much better over all.

I say learn them and practice them regularly, even if you are just playing for fun. How much more fun would playing be if you could effortlessly wail out some tasty fill patterns with speed, accuracy and aggility?  I say it would be way more fun even if you never play for anyone but yourself.

I'll be right back, I'm going to dig out my old rudiment books and practice!  Cool
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